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Early teal season offers first chance for Arkansas duck hunters

Sept. 13, 2019

LITTLE ROCK — Sunday marks the first shot hunters have at taking a duck his year, and it’s a tricky shot at that. The early teal season is open Sept. 15-30, so hunters can have an opportunity to harvest some of these small ducks that typically migrate before the rest of the crowd.

Competitive archery shoot prepares hunters for upcoming deer season

Sept. 11, 2019

MAYFLOWER — The Arkansas Bowhunters Association will host its annual Fall State Championship and Bowhunter Bonanza at the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s Camp Robinson Special Use Area in Mayflower Sept. 21-22. Anyone who is interested in 3D archery and joining a group of avid archers is welcome to attend.

Arkansas students finding interest in fishy school lessons

Sept. 11, 2019

LITTLE ROCK — A recent article titled “Does Fishing Have a Future?” focused on a disturbing trend among Americans that shows fewer anglers hitting the water to wet a line every year. The traditional route of a parent teaching their child to fish is faltering. Fishing In The Natural State, a beginner’s fishing program administered by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, hopes to offset some of this loss in our angling ranks.

AGFC increases free options to test deer for disease

Sept. 11, 2019

LITTLE ROCK — The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission is rolling out additional opportunities for hunters to get their deer tested for chronic wasting disease throughout the state this deer season.

Catch up on Arkansas Wildlife TV this month

Sept. 4, 2019

LITTLE ROCK — Hunting season unofficially kicked off with the opening day of dove season last weekend, and soon many more Arkansans will be heading into the field in search of squirrels, rabbits, waterfowl and deer. It’s also less than a month until the start of another season – the Fall 2019 season of Arkansas Wildlife TV.
 

Saline County landowners burn their way to better habitat

Sept. 4, 2019

BENTON – Some Arkansas private landowners aim to restore part of their acreage to experience quail or turkey hunting they may have enjoyed decades ago. Other landowners, though, may not be focused on hunting. They may just want a plan to dispense with nonnative grasses and Chinese privet dominating their land and turn those acres over to native plants more conducive to wildlife – not just quail or turkey, but the all-important pollinators and what is termed “watchable” wildlife.